Jul
8
Mon
The King’s Trumpeter @ St Dunstans Episcopal Church
Jul 8 @ 7:30 pm – 8:30 pm

Andrew Arthur, organ, Robert Farley, trumpet

 

Daniel Purcell, Trumpet Sonata in C

Henry Purcell, Voluntary for Double Organ, Z. 719

John Weldon, Suite from Judgement of Paris

George Frideric Handel, Fugue in C minor for keyboard, G83

John Stanley, Voluntary in C major for organ, No. 1, Op. 5

Jeremiah Clarke, Trumpet Suite in D major

The Festival’s first performance features two Baroque masters performing in beautiful Carmel Valley. Principal trumpet Robert Farley and principal keyboardist Andrew Arthur present “The King’s Trumpeter.” The title of the concert is taken from the name originally given to the head trumpeter, retained by the King, whose job it was to signal the attack in times of war. It is believed to go back to at least the 13th Century.  St. Dunstan’s beautiful sanctuary and Dobson pipe organ will host this entertaining evening.

Jul
13
Sat
Opening Night: In The Beginning @ Sunset Center Theater
Jul 13 @ 7:30 pm – 9:30 pm

Franz Joseph Haydn, The Creation, HOB XXI:2

Mhairi Lawson, soprano; Thomas Cooley, tenor; Dashon Burton, bass-baritone

Haydn’s masterpiece, The Creation, majestically opens the 82nd Carmel Bach Festival. The performances feature the Festival’s entire company of musicians and will be sung in a Haydn-approved English translation.

Haydn considered The Creation his masterwork. It is the culmination of his creative life that produced more than 100 symphonies, and a plethora of string quartets, operas, masses and other works.

Haydn’s musical setting of the creation story is one of the best-loved works in the choral repertoire because of its dramatic gestures, bold orchestral colors and imaginative word painting. From the creation of light to Adam and Eve’s love duet, Haydn brings to life the birds, beasts and angels as they rejoice in soaring, life-affirming music.

The radiance of The Creation is experienced through the overpowering majesty of the choruses.  Also, the composer’s tremendous word-painting skill with which he creates his descriptive canvasses, and the brilliant orchestration Haydn brought to his famous “London” symphonies and late Masses. Here the orchestration is employed to even more powerful effect, especially in some of the colorful writing for the winds. The orchestra in The Creation is every bit as much a protagonist as the soloists and chorus.

The work is part of the grand orchestral/choral tradition that is in the Festival’s DNA, as represented by such audience favorites such as Beethoven’s 9th Symphony, the Bach Passions, and Carmina Burana.

The Creation’s enduring place in the repertory is because of its appeal on so many levels: It is complex and intricate, yet highly accessible. It is spiritual, but profoundly human. It’s is Haydn’s great expression of gratitude to God, but also a lasting gift to humankind.

“I have lived with Haydn’s Creation all my life,” said Festival Artistic Director Paul Goodwin. “In performances as a boy chorister, as a solo oboist and as a conductor, reveling in its ever-changing colors and glorious architecture. This piece means a lot to me; I hope it will to you too!”

Jul
14
Sun
Bach and Shakespeare – Week 1 @ Sunset Center Theater
Jul 14 @ 4:00 pm – 6:00 pm

Orchestra, Chorale, Chorus and Soloists conducted by Paul Goodwin

J.S. Bach, The Christmas Oratorio, Part I and II, BWV 248

Mhairi Lawson, soprano; Meg Bragle, mezzo-soprano; Thomas Cooley, tenor; Dashon Burton, bass-baritone

Felix Mendelssohn, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Incidental Music, Op. 61

Francesca Faridany, actress

Two titans of Western culture—J.S. Bach and William Shakespeare—are paired in this program.

The first two cantatas of J.S. Bach’s Christmas Oratorio open the relaxing and pastoral afternoon. Trumpets and timpani herald the birth of Jesus to begin the first cantata, a celebration and reflection on the birth of Jesus. Similar to the Matthew and John passions, the Oratorio includes a tenor Evangelist who narrates the story of the birth of Christ. These recitatives introduce and connect lyrical solo arias. The cantatas feature the entire Festival choral ensemble—the professional Chorale and volunteer Chorus—sometimes intoning the well-known Passion choral, which links the birth of Christ with the Passion saga, and more often singing in praise accompanied by a full Baroque orchestra featuring some of Bach’s most brilliant writing.

This realization mirrors Bach’s intent with the Christmas Oratorio, which was created to be performed over several days in Leipzig.

The Sunday programs kick off the complete presentation of The Christmas Oratorio. Two of the remaining cantatas are scheduled for Monday afternoon at All Saints, with the Festival’s four vocal soloists and a small Baroque ensemble directed by Andrew Arthur, and the remaining two cantatas will be presented Wednesday night at the Carmel Mission Basilica by the Chorale accompanied by Baroque strings, brass, and timpani with Andrew Megill, conductor.

The second half of the program is Mendelssohn’s Incidental Music to Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream, with actress Francesca Faridany providing Shakespeare’s narration. Faridany is an international film, TV and theater actress who appears in the movie blockbuster, Black Panther, and also on TV in NBC’s Manifest. She is a past winner of a Tony Award for Best Play (Curious Incident of the Dog in the Nighttime), a Helen Hayes Outstanding Lead Actress Awardand an Outer Critics Circle Outstanding Featured Actress nominee, among many other credits. She has many connections to the Festival. Her grandmother Nancy Morrow, was an early supporter; her mother, Nana, was a longtime Festival administrator, and her sister, pianist Lucy Faridany is the Festival’s Chorus accompanist. A Midsummer Night’s Dream is the perfect complement to a tranquil summer afternoon in Carmel.

“This concert begins the 2019 Christmas Oratorio journey,” said Paul Goodwin, “creating maximum variety with three concerts in three venues with three conductors and three formations. This concert places Bach’s most colorful and pastoral cantatas alongside Mendelssohn’s magical masterpiece, a Midsummer Night’s Dream.  A concert that encapsulates the beauty of Carmel-by-the-Sea, looking both to the spirit and to nature.”

Sweet Harmonie @ All Saints' Episcopal Church
Jul 14 @ 8:30 pm – 9:30 pm

Neil Tatman, Ellen Sherman, oboe; Ginger Kroft, Erin Finkelstein clarinet; Laura Koepke, Justin Cummings, bassoon; Alicia Mastromonaco, horn; Kevin Neuhoff, percussion

Gordon Jacob, Divertimento
Arvo Pärt, Fratres
Ludwig van Beethoven, Octet, op. 103

 

The Sunday candlelight concerts at All Saints church are the perfect way to end your Festival weekend. The 2019 Festival offers two fascinating programs—woodwind octets from Gordon Jacob, Arvo Pärt and Beethoven the first Sunday, and “Songs of the Night,” presenting the men of the Festival Chorale and Chorus in a special program devoted to nocturnal music directed by associate conductor Andrew Megill.

Jul
15
Mon
All Bach Organ Recital – Week 1 @ Carmel Mission Basilica
Jul 15 @ 11:00 am – 12:00 pm

Andrew Arthur organ

J.S. Bach, Fantasia & Fugue in C minor, BWV 537

 

Chorale Preludes for the season of Advent:
Nun komm, der Heiden Heiland, BWV 659

Nun komm, der Heiden Heiland, BWV 660

Nun komm, der Heiden Heiland, BWV 661

Meine Seele, erhebt den Herren, BWV 648

Meine Seele, erhebt den Herren, BWV 733


J.S. Bach, Pastorella in F, BWV 590

J.S. Bach, Toccata & Fugue in D minor, “Dorian,” BWV 538

 

 

Andrew Arthur is the principal keyboardist and director of the Twilight in the Cathedral concerts. He is the director of music at Trinity Hall in Cambridge, England, the associate director of the Hanover Band, principal conductor of the Euterpe Baroque Consort and musical director of Orpheus Britannicus. His annual recitals at the iconic Carmel Mission Basilica are highlights of the chamber concert schedule.

Bach and the Violin – Week 1 @ Sunset Center Foyer
Jul 15 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm

Emlyn Ngai, violin

 

Thomas Baltzar, Prelude in D (from The Division Violinist, 1684) 

Variation                              Thomas Baltzar, Divisions upon John come kiss me now

StyluFantasticus              H.I.F. von Biber, Sonata No.1  The Annunciation (Mystery Sonatas)

Counterpoint                       J.S. Bach, Sonata No.3 in C Major, BWV 1005: 2. Fuga

Galant style                         J. H. Roman,  Assagio BeR10

Dance & style brisé    

Georg Philip Telemann, Fantasie Nr.9 in B minor: 1. Siciliana, 2. Vivace, 3. Allegro
J. S. Bach, Partita  No1 B minor, BWV 1002: 1. Allemande; Double; 2. Corrente; Double

Fantasy & the spirit of improvisation

Nicolas Matteis, Jr., Fantasia in C minor
Giuseppe Tartini, Sonata d3 for violin senza basso: 1.  Cantabile, 2.  Presto

Christmas at All Saints – Week 1 @ All Saints' Episcopal Church
Jul 15 @ 2:30 pm – 3:30 pm

 Andrew Arthur, organ and director; Mhairi Lawson, soprano; Meg Bragle, mezzo-soprano; Thomas Cooley, tenor; Dashon Burton bass-baritone, bass; Gonzalo Ruiz, Stephen Bard, oboe and oboes d’amore; Meredith Brown, Alicia Mastromonaco, horn; Cristina Zacharias, Marika Holmqvist, violins; Cynthia Black, viola; Eva Lymenstull, cello; Derek Weller, bass.

J.S. Bach, The Christmas Oratorio, Part IV and V, BWV 248

 

After the celebratory opening cantatas are performed on Sunday afternoons at Sunset Center, parts IV and V will be staged at All Saints Church on Monday afternoons. This is the best opportunity to hear the Festival’s four vocal soloists in an intimate setting, accompanied by a small Baroque ensemble under the direction of Andrew Arthur.

Psycho! – Week 1 @ Sunset Center Theater
Jul 15 @ 7:30 pm – 9:30 pm

Edvard Grieg, Holberg Suite, Op. 40

John Adams, Shaker Loops

Bernard Herrmann, Suite from Psycho

Edward Elgar, Nimrod from Enigma Variations, (as heard in Dunkirk)

William Walton, Two movements from Henry V

Stanley Myers, Cavatina (Deer Hunter Theme)

Howard Shore, Concerning Hobbits (The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring)

John Williams, Theme from Schindler’s List

J.S. Bach, Air (from Orchestral Suite No. 3)

Monday’s program stretches the imagination.

Concertmaster Peter Hanson continues to create imaginative programming with this concert, entitled Psycho!

The program’s first half presents the neo-Baroque classic Holberg Suite by Edvard Grieg, and Shaker Loops by America’s greatest living composer, John Adams. Shaker Loops was created in the composer’s unique minimalist style, and has a mesmerizing impact.

The suite from Psycho, composed by Bernard Herrmann begins a second half dedicated to great film music. Herrmann’s score is seen as the perfect match for the Alfred Hitchcock classic, and like other great film music, paints indelible images in the listener’s mind. Imagine the famous shower scene from Psycho without the chilling music?

Other movie classics in the second half include John Williams’s haunting violin solo from Schindler’s List  and Elgar’s stunning “Nimrod” movement from his Enigma Variations, which was used in the movie “Dunkirk.”

“This concert is a fusion of sound and vision,” said concertmaster Peter Hanson. “The first half of the concert is a collection that inspires visions and the second half is music that is inspired by vision. The Holberg Suite by Grieg is a visual portrait of a Scandinavian story, complete with landscapes and people; the Adams’ inspires one to see the music as slowly changing patterns of feelings in the air. The fantastic collection of music in the second half illustrates the emotions of film. Here the vision has inspired the music. It’s often the essence of the film concentrated into musical expression.”

 Hanson is a period instrument specialist and recording artist. He is in his ninth season as concertmaster of the Carmel Bach Festival Orchestra. He has performed with modern and period instrument including the Academy of St. Martin in the Fields and the London Symphony and served as concertmaster for Mstislav Rostropovich and the Philharmonia Orchestra as well as Sir John Eliot Gardiner’s Orchestre Revolutionaire et Romantique for more than 25 years appearing on nearly all its recordings and concerts.

Jul
16
Tue
Bach and the Viola – Week 1 @ Sunset Center Foyer
Jul 16 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm

Sarah Darling, viola

Christopher Hossfeld, Fantasie in C

(a reaction to the Bach 3rd Suite; world premiere of the version for viola)

Paul Hindemith, Sonata op. 25/1

Caroline Shaw, In Manus Tuas

J.S. Bach, Suite No. 3, BWV 1009

English Ayres for the Theatre – Week 1 @ All Saints Episcopal Church
Jul 16 @ 2:30 pm – 3:30 pm

Virginia Warnken Kelsey, mezzo-soprano; Andrew Fuchs, tenor; Jonathan Woody, bass-baritone; Stephen Bard, oboe; Edwin Huizinga and Adriane Post, violin; Sarah Darling, viola; Paul Dwyer, cello; Dan Swenberg, guitar and lute; Dongsok Shin, harpsichord

 

The First Musick:
Henry Purcell        Curtain Tune (from Timon’s of Athens) – Rondeau Minuet, Aire, Jigg (from the Gordion Knot Unty’d)
(1659-1695) 

The Tempest:

  • Matthew Locke, Curtain Tune
    (c.1621-1677)
  • James Hart, Adieu to the Pleasures and Follies of Love
    (1647-1718)
  • Mathew Locke, Rutick Air
    (c.1621-1677)
  • Henry Purcell, Dear Pretty Youth
    (1659-1695) 

The Fairy Queen:

  • Come all ye Songsters 
  • Prelude
  • One Charming Night 
  • Hush, no more 
  • Dance for the Followers of Night

The Second Musick:

Slow Aire (the Distressed Innocence) & Hornpipe on a Ground (The Married Beau)

The Judgments of Paris:

  • Daniel Purcell, Mercury’s aria: From Olympus, I come
    (1664-1717)      
  • John Eccles, Symphony & Venus’ aria:  Nature framed thee sure for loving
    (1668-1735)  
  • Daniel Purcell, Paris’ aria: I yield, take the Prize
    (1664-1717)  

The Third Musick:

Henry Purcell, Rondeau Hornpipe (Abdelazar)

King Arthur:

Henry Purcell, Chaconne: How Happy the Lover

                                                    For Love, every Creature is formed by his Nature 

 

 

Saints and Sinners – Week 1 @ Sunset Center Theater
Jul 16 @ 7:30 pm – 9:30 pm

Orchestra, Chorale, Chorus, Soloists conducted by Paul Goodwin
Mhairi Lawson, soprano; Meg Bragle, mezzo-soprano; Thomas Cooley, tenor; Dashon Burton, bass-baritone;

George Frideric Handel        Acis and Galatea

Overture

Chorus : Oh the pleasure of the plains

Tenor Aria (Acis): Love in her eyes

Soprano Aria (Galatea): As when the dove

Bass-Baritone Aria (Polephemus) : I Rage –  /  O Ruddier than the cherry

Trio : The flocks shall leave the mountains

Tenor Aria: Help, Galatea, Help!

Chorus : Galatea Dry thy tears

Igor Stravinsky The Rake’s Progress

Instrumental Introduction

Tenor Aria:  Here I stand

Chorus and Bass Solo:  The Sun is Bright

Soprano – cabaletta:  I go, I go to him

Mezzo-Soprano Aria : Come, sweet, come; Scorned, Abused

Chorus : Ruin, Disaster. Shame

Tenor aria :  I Burn, I burn! I freeze; With roses crowned

Chorus:  Mourn for Adonis

Epilogue

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart  The Marriage of Figaro

Overture

Soprano and Bass-Baritone Duet: Cinque, Dieci, Venti

Bass-Baritone Aria:  Se vuol ballare

Mezzo-Soprano Aria: Voi che sapete

Tenor Aria: In quagl’anni

Soprano, Tenor, Bass-Baritone Trio: Cosa sento

Chorus : Gio Vani liete

Georges Bizet  Highlights from Carmen

Overture

Mezzo-Soprano Aria: Gypsy song

Tenor Aria: La fleur que tu m’avais

Mezzo-Soprano and Chorus: Habanera

Soprano Aria: Je dis que rien

Bass-Baritone and Chorus: Toreadors Song

“All opera is about saints, sinners, seducers, victims and death! In this evening of drama and excitement we present four contrasting operas that show elements of all these traits that make opera so compelling,” said Paul Goodwin

The Tuesday evening performances explore the saint and sinner characters as depicted by four major opera composers. The evening begins with the story of the beautiful Galatea’s (Mhairi Lawson) love for the shepherd Acis (Thomas Cooley), and of the monstrous giant Polyphemus (Dashon Burton) jealousy and desire for Galatea.

Stravinsky’s The Rake’s Progress is a neo-Baroque work, and is nothing like you might have heard before from the Russian master. The story tells of Tom Rakewell (Thomas Cooley), an impressionable young man who jilts his fiancée, Anne Trulove (Mhairi Lawson), for the get-rich-quick promises made by the sinister Nick Shadow (Dashon Burton), who really is the Devil. After several misadventures, all initiated by the devious Shadow, Tom ends up in Bedlam, an insane asylum. In true devotion to Tom, Anne Trulove rescues his soul at the opera’s conclusion.

Mozart’s Marriage of Figaro beings with one of the shortest but most memorable overtures in the repertory. The opera tells the story of the servants Figaro and Susanna, who get married. This spoils the efforts of their philandering employer, Count Almaviva to seduce Susanna, teaching the sinner Count a lesson in fidelity. Marriage of Figaro’s lighthearted and melodic sensibility has made it an audience favorite since its debut in 1786.

The evening concludes with Carmen, which has everything that makes for a beloved opera: passionate drama, great characters, a love story, and some of the best known and loved music. Bizet’s work is packed with great and instantly familiar melodies including the Habanera and the Gypsy Song—sung by the title character as performed by Meg Bragle— and concluding with the Toreador’s Song, as performed by our Toreador, Dashon Burton. The character of Carmen is both saint and sinner and serves as the perfect capstone for the evening. She is a seducer, yet is also a fragile victim and strong feminist.

Jul
17
Wed
Bach and the Lute – week 1 @ Sunset Center Foyer
Jul 17 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm

Daniel Swenberg, lute, Dongsok Shin, lautenwerk

Exploring Bach’s music for the Lute and Lute-Harpsichord (Lautenwerk)

 

Sylvius Leopold Weiss, Duet in C: Andante, Minuet
J.S. Bach, Prelude (Grave, Vîte)—Lute, BWV 995
J.S. Bach, Prelude, Fugue, Allegro — lautenwerk, BWV 998

 

A Century of Venice – Week 1 @ All Saints' Episcopal Church
Jul 17 @ 2:30 pm – 3:30 pm

Johanna Novom, Evan Few, violin; Kyle Miller, Joseph Tan, viola; Eva Lymenstull, cello; Daniel Swenberg, lute; Dongsok Shin, harpsichord.

 

Johann Rosenmüller                                 Sonata Decima à 5 in F Major
(1619-1684)

Giovanni Battista Fontana                      Sonata Seconda a violino solo
(1589-1630)

Antonio Vivaldi                                             Trio Sonata in A Major, Op. 1, no. 9, RV 75
(1678-1741)

Domenico Gabrielli                                  Ricercar for Violoncello solo
(1659-1690)

Biagio Marini                                              Passacaglia from Sonata a tre, Op. 22
(1594-1663)

Johann Rosenmüller                                Sonata Ottava à 5 in E Minor
(1619-1684)

Dario Castello                                              Sonata Decima Quinta à 4
(1602-1631)

Women of Influence @ Church in the Forest
Jul 17 @ 5:00 pm – 6:00 pm

Peter Hanson, violin, Mhairi Lawson, soprano, Andrew Arthur, fortepiano

 

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Sonata for Violin and Fortepiano in E Minor, K. 304
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Dans un bois solitaire, K308, A flat (1778); Das Veilchen, K476, G major (1785); Abendempfindung, K523, F major (1787); Als Luise die Briefe, K.520, C minor (1787)
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Sonata for Violin and Fortepiano in Bb Major, K. 454

Enjoy two Mozart sonatas for fortepiano and violin, all dedicated to important women who supported Mozart. Concertmaster Peter Hanson is the soloist, accompanied by principal keyboardist Andrew Arthur, performing on the fortepiano, the predecessor to the modern concert grand piano. The center of the program features soprano Mhairi Lawson performing four delightful Mozart songs.

Christmas at the Mission – Week 1 @ Carmel Mission Basilica
Jul 17 @ 8:30 pm – 9:30 pm

Orchestra and Chorale conducted by Andrew Megill

J.S. Bach, The Christmas Oratorio, Part III and VI, BWV 248
Arvo Pärt, Seven Magnificat Antiphons

The Christmas Oratorio’s third and final cantatas comprise the major portion of the annual Carmel Mission Basilica concerts. Interlaced with the two cantatas are Estonian composer Arvo Pärt’s Seven Magnificat Antiphons, a stunning a capella work with texts that would normally be sung individually as antiphons to the Magnificat at Vespers on the seven evenings preceding Christmas Eve. Pärt’s composition is hauntingly beautiful and is a perfect suited for the Carmel Mission Basilica.

The fifth cantata depicts the journey of the Magi, and was meant for performance on the first Sunday after the  New Year and tells a story about unifying heaven and earth. All the elements of Bach’s great Passions are here, including an tenor evangelist to tell the story, beautiful chorales, and solo arias, all performed by members of the remarkable Festival Chorale.

The final cantata of The Christmas Oratorio was composed for the Feast of the Epiphany, or the final day of the Feast of Christmas. The work is one of joyful optimism, with a brilliant and festive chorus accompanied by an orchestra that continues the vivid and celebratory tone of the first cantata presented on the Sunday afternoon concerts. Trumpets and timpani close the Oratorio in a blaze of glory.

“This concert is the final chapter of the Christmas Oratorio journey, coupled with a set of beautiful a cappella works by Arvo Pärt, the great Estonian ‘spiritual minimalist.’ His Seven Magnificat Antiphons, sprinkled throughout the program, are meditative, trance-like, and transcendent,” said associate conductor Andrew Megill.

Andrew Megill is the artistic director of Fuma Sacra and serves as chorusmaster for the Montreal Symphony Orchestra. He is also music director of Masterwork Chorus and professor and director of choral activities at the University of Illinois. He is in his 12th season as associate conductor of the Carmel Bach Festival and director of the chorale and chorus.

Jul
18
Thu
Bach A Capella – week 1 @ Sunset Center Foyer
Jul 18 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm

Molly Quinn, Jennifer Paulino, soprano; Virginia Warnken Kelsey, mezzo-soprano; Andrew Fuchs, Timothy Hodges, tenor; Jonathan Woody, bass

Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina, Assumpta est Maria
Josquin Desprez, Ave verum corpus
Josquin Desprez, Virgo Prudentissima 
Orlando di Lasso,
 Tristis est anima mea
Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina, Super flumina Babylonis
Tomás Luis de Victoria, Nigra sum sed Formosa
Claudio Merulo, Vos qui reliquisti omnia
Heinrich Schütz, Selig sind die Toten
Johann Joseph Fux, Ad te, Domine, levavi
Johann Kuhnau, Tristis est anima mea
J.S. Bach, Jesu, meine Freude

Twilight in the Cathedral – week 1 @ San Carlos Cathedral
Jul 18 @ 5:00 pm – 6:00 pm

Andrew Arthur, harpsichord, organ, and director; Robert Farley, trumpet, Emlyn Ngai, Gabrielle Wunsch, Evan Few, Joseph Tan, violin; Clio Tilton, viola; Paul Dwyer, cello; Jordan Frazier, bass; Michael Beattie, harpsichord

Antonio VivaldiConcerto in D major for 4 Violins, Op. 3, No. 1 (from L’estro armonico)

Antonio VivaldiConcerto in D minor for 2 Violins, Op. 3, No. 11 (from L’estro armonico)

John EcclesA Sett of Aires made for the Queen’s Coronation (1702)

George Frideric Handel, Concerto in F major for Organ & Strings, Op. 4, No. 5

Gottfried FingerSonata in C for Trumpet, Violin and Continuo

 

Monterey’s iconic and beautiful San Carlos Cathedral has hosted Bach Festival twilight concerts for many years. The 2019 program features classic Baroque violin, organ and trumpet works. Enjoy some of the Festival’s finest Baroque musicians performing in the magnificent setting of the San Carlos Cathedral, just steps from downtown Monterey.

The Frozen North – Folk and Baroque from Scandinavia @ Sunset Center Theater
Jul 18 @ 7:30 pm – 9:30 pm

Edwin Huizinga, violin and William Coulter, guitar, known as Fire & Grace, return after sold-out concerts in 2017 and 2018. The duo is joined by reknown Swedish nyckelharpa virtuoso Olov Johansson, foremost performer on the traditional Swedish instrument called the NyckelHarpa.

 

Three Tunes
Bingsjö Långdans, Trad. Swedish
Heaven’s Polska, Trad. Finnish
Lappa Skor,  Trad. Swedish

“Jag unnar dig ändå allt gott,” Trad. Swedish

String Quartet (from the Danish String Quartet)
Polska from Dorotea – Traditional
AE Romeser – Traditional
Shine You No More – Rune Tonsgaard Sorensen

Stormyren, Eric Sahlström (1912–1986)
Olov Johansson, nyckelharpa

Largo from the Double Violin Concerto, JS Bach (1685-1750)

Konvulsionslåten, Anders Norudde (b.1960)

Tanya’s Tune, Roger Talroth
Fire & Grace

Varvind, Antti Järvelä (Finland), Arr. by Karl-Johan Ankarblom

Violin Concerto in D minor, Johan Helmich Roman
Edwin Huizinga, violin

Bisonpolska, Olov Johansson (b.1966)

Polska Efter Pelle Pederson, Traditional Swedish

IPA-Gubben, Olov Johansson (b.1966)

Kylä vuotti uutta kuuta, Värttinä (Finland)

 

This nyckelharpa is a keyed fiddle, and produces a hauntingly beautiful sound, evocative of the Scandinavian countries.

This unique program will include traditional and contemporary Scandinavian folk music and songs, including arrangements of traditional Swedish dance tunes called the “polska,” and contemporary compositions from the Swedish supergroup Väsen. The Baroque side of Scandinavian music will be represented by a performance of Johan Helmich Roman’s Violin Concerto in D minor. Roman is known as the “Handel of Swedish Music.” The concert will also feature “Bach dances the Polska,” a blending of Baroque and Swedish dance tunes.

Edwin Huizinga, Johanna Novom, and Adriane Post, violin; Sarah Darling, viola; Paul Dwyer, cello; Jordan Frazier, bass; William Coulter, guitar; Dongsok Shin, harpsichord; Olov Johansson, nyckelharpa (pictured right)

Molly Quinn, Melanie Russell, soprano; Virginia Warnken Kelsey, mezzo-soprano; Owen McIntosh, tenor

Jul
19
Fri
Bach and the Flute – week 1 @ Sunset Center Foyer
Jul 19 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm

Robin Carlson Peery, flute; Karina Schmitz, viola; Simon Martyn-Ellis, guitar

Ludwig van Beethoven, Serenade, Op. 8 for Flute, Viola, and Guitar
Francesco Molino, Notturno, Op. 37 for Flute and Guitar
Wenzel Thomas Matiegka, Notturno, Op. 21 for Flute, Viola, and Guitar
Mauro Giuliani, Duettino facile, Op. 77 for Flute and Guitar
J.S. Bach / Charles Gounod, Ave Maria

Five to Fandango – Week 1 @ All Saints' Episcopal Church
Jul 19 @ 2:30 pm – 3:30 pm

Cynthia Roberts, Patricia Ahern, violin; Karina Schmitz, viola; Allen Whear, Timothy Roberts, cello

 

Franz Joseph HaydnQuartet Quartet in G Major, op. 64, no.  4

Gioachino RossiniSonata no. 6, “Il Tempesta”

Luigi Boccherini, Fandango Quintet

GUITAR HERO – Week 1 @ Sunset Center Theater
Jul 19 @ 7:30 pm – 9:30 pm

Orchestra conducted by Paul Goodwin, Jason Vieaux, guitar

  • Gioachino Rossini William Tell Overture
  • Joaquin Rodrigo, Concierto de Aranjuez
  • Mark Mancina, Guitar Concerto (based on themes from Twister and other Mancina film scores
  • Ludwig van Beethoven, Symphony No. 4 in Bb Major, Op. 60

Rossini’s William Tell was the last of the 39 operas the prolific composer created. The overture is a miniature symphony in four parts depicting the opera’s Swiss Alps location. The overture is justifiably one of the best-known works in classical music. The four sections include dawn, an approaching storm, pastoral third section featuring a plaintive English horn and flute duet and the famous wild galloping finish. This final section portrays Swiss soldiers’ heroic battle to liberate their homeland and was used as the theme to the famous radio and television show, The Lone Ranger. 

The center of the concert is occupied by two guitar works—one, the greatest of the genre and the other a world premiere!  In Rodrigo’s Concierto de Aranjuez, you can hear the creative juxtaposition of folksongs with the composer’s imaginative orchestration. The composition’s lyrical themes and its animated dance rhythms are evocative of the gardens of Aranjuez, Spain and the warmth of the Andalusian sun that inspired the work.

Hollywood film composer and Carmel resident Mark Mancina trained as a classical guitarist, and made his name with the scores to movies such as Twister and Speed. Mancina has taken two of his film scores and added a brand new first movement to create a Guitar Concerto.

The soloist for both concerti is Jason Vieaux, a Grammy-winning artist known for his soulful artistry. Vieaux has performed as concerto soloist with over 100 orchestras, including Cleveland, Toronto, Houston, San Diego, Buffalo, Auckland Philharmonia, and Orchestra of St. Luke’s. Recent highlights include performances at Caramoor Festival as Artist-in-Residence, Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, Philadelphia Chamber Music Society, Curtis Presents, Phillips Collection, National Gallery of Art, Buenos Aires’ Teatro Colon, Amsterdam’s Concertgebouw, New York’s 92Y, and Ravinia Festival.

The concert concludes with Beethoven’s sunny Fourth Symphony. The work harkens back to Beethoven’s teacher, Haydn, and has an extraordinarily explosive final movement. The piece is a continuation of a the very popular Beethoven symphony cycle that began in 2015.

“I view introducing new compositions as an essential part of an artistic director’s job,” said Paul Goodwin. “To encourage new talent, to enrich the listening experience of our audience, to appeal to our youth and to help create pieces that will help establish the Carmel Bach Festival as an innovator throughout the world. I am thrilled that Mark Mancina has accepted our commission and has written such a beautiful piece. My other main goal for this concert was to surround it with sympathetic sounds and compositions and to leave our Festival audience breathless with Beethoven’s most thrilling finale!”

Jul
20
Sat
Family Concert @ Sunset Center Theater
Jul 20 @ 11:00 am – 12:00 pm
Family Concert @ Sunset Center Theater | Carmel-by-the-Sea | California | United States

Members of the Carmel Bach Festival Orchestra, narrated by Paul Goodwin; Story and direction by Suzanne Mudge; Special guests – Youth Orchestra of Salinas Choir

Now in its sixth year, the intrepid duo of Leonard and Rasmus, narrated by Bach Festival Artistic Director Paul Goodwin, take listeners of all ages on an action-packed whirlwind of musical experiences set in an engaging story line.

Leonard and Rasmus explore the vast world of insects and bee-eautiful bugs through music, science, and amusing puns and tales, while Leonard learns to control his temper. Music by Bartok, Handel, Chopin, Roussel, Rimsky-Korsakov, Vaughan Williams, the Beatles, and more.

George Frideric Handel, “He Spake The Word” (Israel in Egypt)
Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov, Flight of the Bumblebee
Béla Bartók, Diary of a Fly
Libby Larsen, Bee Navigation
Ralph Vaughan Williams, The Wasps, March Past the Kitchen Utensils
John Williams, Farewell Aragog
Traditional, Hotaru Koi (featuring students from the Youth Orchestra of Salinas)
Ernst Bacon, Dusk Over the Marsh
Amy Beach, The Fire-Flies
Elena Kats-Chernin, Butterflying

Young Artists Showcase @ Sunset Center Theater
Jul 20 @ 2:30 pm – 3:30 pm

The Carmel Bach Festival Young Artists Competition recognizes talented young musicians from the Central Coast. This showcase presents accomplished young soloists, pianists, instrumentalists, vocalists, and chamber ensembles performing on the Sunset Center main stage.

In The Beginning – Week 2 @ Sunset Center Theater
Jul 20 @ 7:30 pm – 9:30 pm

Franz Joseph Haydn, The Creation, HOB XXI:2

Mhairi Lawson, soprano; Thomas Cooley, tenor; Dashon Burton, bass-baritone

Haydn’s masterpiece, The Creation, majestically opens the 82nd Carmel Bach Festival. The performances feature the Festival’s entire company of musicians and will be sung in a Haydn-approved English translation.

Haydn considered The Creation his masterwork. It is the culmination of his creative life that produced more than 100 symphonies, and a plethora of string quartets, operas, masses and other works.

Haydn’s musical setting of the creation story is one of the best-loved works in the choral repertoire because of its dramatic gestures, bold orchestral colors and imaginative word painting. From the creation of light to Adam and Eve’s love duet, Haydn brings to life the birds, beasts and angels as they rejoice in soaring, life-affirming music.

The radiance of The Creation is experienced through the overpowering majesty of the choruses.  Also, the composer’s tremendous word-painting skill with which he creates his descriptive canvasses, and the brilliant orchestration Haydn brought to his famous “London” symphonies and late Masses. Here the orchestration is employed to even more powerful effect, especially in some of the colorful writing for the winds. The orchestra in The Creation is every bit as much a protagonist as the soloists and chorus.

The work is part of the grand orchestral/choral tradition that is in the Festival’s DNA, as represented by such audience favorites such as Beethoven’s 9th Symphony, the Bach Passions, and Carmina Burana.

The Creation’s enduring place in the repertory is because of its appeal on so many levels: It is complex and intricate, yet highly accessible. It is spiritual, but profoundly human. It’s is Haydn’s great expression of gratitude to God, but also a lasting gift to humankind.

“I have lived with Haydn’s Creation all my life,” said Festival Artistic Director Paul Goodwin. “In performances as a boy chorister, as a solo oboist and as a conductor, reveling in its ever-changing colors and glorious architecture. This piece means a lot to me; I hope it will to you too!”

Jul
21
Sun
Bach and Shakespeare – Week 2 @ Sunset Center Theater
Jul 21 @ 4:00 pm – 6:00 pm

Orchestra, Chorale, Chorus and Soloists conducted by Paul Goodwin

J.S. Bach, The Christmas Oratorio, Part I and II, BWV 248

Mhairi Lawson, soprano; Meg Bragle, mezzo-soprano; Thomas Cooley, tenor; Dashon Burton, bass-baritone

Felix Mendelssohn, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Incidental Music, Op. 61

Francesca Faridany, actress

Two titans of Western culture—J.S. Bach and William Shakespeare—are paired in this program.

The first two cantatas of J.S. Bach’s Christmas Oratorio open the relaxing and pastoral afternoon. Trumpets and timpani herald the birth of Jesus to begin the first cantata, a celebration and reflection on the birth of Jesus. Similar to the Matthew and John passions, the Oratorio includes a tenor Evangelist who narrates the story of the birth of Christ. These recitatives introduce and connect lyrical solo arias. The cantatas feature the entire Festival choral ensemble—the professional Chorale and volunteer Chorus—sometimes intoning the well-known Passion choral, which links the birth of Christ with the Passion saga, and more often singing in praise accompanied by a full Baroque orchestra featuring some of Bach’s most brilliant writing.

This realization mirrors Bach’s intent with the Christmas Oratorio, which was created to be performed over several days in Leipzig.

The Sunday programs kick off the complete presentation of The Christmas Oratorio. Two of the remaining cantatas are scheduled for Monday afternoon at All Saints, with the Festival’s four vocal soloists and a small Baroque ensemble directed by Andrew Arthur, and the remaining two cantatas will be presented Wednesday night at the Carmel Mission Basilica by the Chorale accompanied by Baroque strings, brass, and timpani with Andrew Megill, conductor.

The second half of the program is Mendelssohn’s Incidental Music to Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream, with actress Francesca Faridany providing Shakespeare’s narration. Faridany is an international film, TV and theater actress who appears in the movie blockbuster, Black Panther, and also on TV in NBC’s Manifest. She is a past winner of a Tony Award for Best Play (Curious Incident of the Dog in the Nighttime), a Helen Hayes Outstanding Lead Actress Award and an Outer Critics Circle Outstanding Featured Actress nominee, among many other credits. She has many connections to the Festival. Her grandmother Nancy Morrow, was an early supporter; her mother, Nana, was a longtime Festival administrator, and her sister, pianist Lucy Faridany is the Festival’s Chorus accompanist. A Midsummer Night’s Dream is the perfect complement to a tranquil summer afternoon in Carmel.

“This concert begins the 2019 Christmas Oratorio journey,” said Paul Goodwin, “creating maximum variety with three concerts in three venues with three conductors and three formations. This concert places Bach’s most colorful and pastoral cantatas alongside Mendelssohn’s magical masterpiece, a Midsummer Night’s Dream.  A concert that encapsulates the beauty of Carmel-by-the-Sea, looking both to the spirit and to nature.”

Songs of the Night @ All Saints' Episcopal Church
Jul 21 @ 8:30 pm – 9:30 pm

Men of the Carmel Bach Festival Chorale and Chorus; Meg Bragle, mezzo-soprano; Andrew Megill, conductor; Meg Bragle, mezzo-soprano, Owen McInstosh, tenor, Timothy Krol, bass-baritone; Kristin Ditlow, Lucy Faridany, piano

 

Franz Schubert, Die Nacht, D983c

Anton Bruckner, Um Mitternacht, WAB 89
Meg Bragle, mezzo-soprano

Franz Schubert, La pastorella al prato, D513

Franz Schubert, Nachthelle, D982

Franz Schubert, Ständchen, D920
Meg Bragle, mezzo-soprano

Pavel Chesnokov, Spasyeniye, op 25/5

Sergei Rachmaninov, Slava v vishich Bogu (Vespers, op. 37/7: The Six Psalms)

Francis Poulenc, Quatre petites prieres            

Ralph Vaughan Williams, Down among the dead men   

Ralph Vaughan Williams, The Turtle Dove

arr. Jonathan Quick, Loch Lomond     

Arthur Sullivan, The Long Day Closes

Lewis Spratlan, Travels

Franz Biebl, Ave Maria

 

The Sunday candlelight concerts at All Saints church are the perfect way to end your Festival weekend. The 2019 Festival offers two fascinating programs—woodwind octets from Gordon Jacob, Arvo Pärt  and Beethoven the first Sunday, and “Songs of the Night,” presenting the men of the Festival Chorale and Chorus in a special program devoted to nocturnal music directed by associate conductor Andrew Megill.

Jul
22
Mon
All Bach Organ Recital – Week 2 @ Carmel Mission Basilica
Jul 22 @ 11:00 am – 12:00 pm

Andrew Arthur organ

J.S. Bach, Fantasia & Fugue in C minor, BWV 537

 

Chorale Preludes for the season of Advent:
Nun komm, der Heiden Heiland, BWV 659

Nun komm, der Heiden Heiland, BWV 660

Nun komm, der Heiden Heiland, BWV 661

Meine Seele, erhebt den Herren, BWV 648

Meine Seele, erhebt den Herren, BWV 733


J.S. Bach, Pastorella in F, BWV 590

J.S. Bach, Toccata & Fugue in D minor, “Dorian,” BWV 538

 

 

Andrew Arthur is the principal keyboardist and director of the Twilight in the Cathedral concerts. He is the director of music at Trinity Hall in Cambridge, England, the associate director of the Hanover Band, principal conductor of the Euterpe Baroque Consort and musical director of Orpheus Britannicus. His annual recitals at the iconic Carmel Mission Basilica are highlights of the chamber concert schedule.

Bach and the Violin – Week 2 @ Sunset Center Foyer
Jul 22 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm

Emlyn Ngai, violin

 

Thomas Baltzar, Prelude in D (from The Division Violinist, 1684) 

Variation                              Thomas Baltzar, Divisions upon John come kiss me now

StyluFantasticus              H.I.F. von Biber, Sonata No.1  The Annunciation (Mystery Sonatas)

Counterpoint                       J.S. Bach, Sonata No.3 in C Major, BWV 1005: 2. Fuga

Galant style                         J. H. Roman,  Assagio BeR10

Dance & style brisé    

Georg Philip Telemann, Fantasie Nr.9 in B minor: 1. Siciliana, 2. Vivace, 3. Allegro
J. S. Bach, Partita  No1 B minor, BWV 1002: 1. Allemande; Double; 2. Corrente; Double

Fantasy & the spirit of improvisation

Nicolas Matteis, Jr., Fantasia in C minor
Giuseppe Tartini, Sonata d3 for violin senza basso: 1.  Cantabile, 2.  Presto

Christmas at All Saints – Week 2 @ All Saints' Episcopal Church
Jul 22 @ 2:30 pm – 3:30 pm

 Andrew Arthur, organ and director; Mhairi Lawson, soprano; Meg Bragle, mezzo-soprano; Thomas Cooley, tenor; Dashon Burton bass-baritone, bass; Gonzalo Ruiz, Stephen Bard, oboe and oboes d’amore; Meredith Brown, Alicia Mastromonaco, horn; Cristina Zacharias, Marika Holmqvist, violins; Cynthia Black, viola; Eva Lymenstull, cello; Derek Weller, bass.

J.S. Bach, The Christmas Oratorio, Part IV and V, BWV 248

 

After the celebratory opening cantatas are performed on Sunday afternoons at Sunset Center, parts IV and V will be staged at All Saints Church on Monday afternoons. This is the best opportunity to hear the Festival’s four vocal soloists in an intimate setting, accompanied by a small Baroque ensemble under the direction of Andrew Arthur.

Fire & Grace & Ice @ Church in the Forest
Jul 22 @ 4:00 pm – 5:15 pm

Edwin Huizinga, violin and William Coulter, guitar, known as Fire & Grace, is joined by Swedish nyckelharpa virtuoso Olov Johansson, foremost performer on the traditional Swedish instrument called the NyckelHarpa.  The trio will present repertoire folk and Baroque music from Scandinavia. Some repertoire features the unique Hardanger Fiddle, a traditional stringed instrument used to play the music of Norway. In modern designs, this type of fiddle is very similar to the violin, though with eight or nine strings (rather than four as on a standard violin) and thinner wood. Four of the strings are strung and played like a violin, while the rest, aptly named understrings or sympathetic strings, resonate under the influence of the other four.

 

Psycho! – Week 2 @ Sunset Center Theater
Jul 22 @ 7:30 pm – 9:30 pm

Edvard Grieg, Holberg Suite, Op. 40

John Adams, Shaker Loops

Bernard Herrmann, Suite from Psycho

Edward Elgar, Nimrod from Enigma Variations, (as heard in Dunkirk)

William Walton, Two movements from Henry V

Stanley Myers, Cavatina (Deer Hunter Theme)

Howard Shore, Concerning Hobbits (The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring)

John Williams, Theme from Schindler’s List

J.S. Bach, Air (from Orchestral Suite No. 3)

Monday’s program stretches the imagination.

Concertmaster Peter Hanson continues to create imaginative programming with this concert, entitled Psycho!

The program’s first half presents the neo-Baroque classic Holberg Suite by Edvard Grieg, and Shaker Loops by America’s greatest living composer, John Adams. Shaker Loops was created in the composer’s unique minimalist style, and has a mesmerizing impact.

The suite from Psycho, composed by Bernard Herrmann begins a second half dedicated to great film music. Herrmann’s score is seen as the perfect match for the Alfred Hitchcock classic, and like other great film music, paints indelible images in the listener’s mind. Imagine the famous shower scene from Psycho without the chilling music?

Other movie classics in the second half include John Williams’s haunting violin solo from Schindler’s List  and Elgar’s stunning “Nimrod” movement from his Enigma Variations, which was used in the movie “Dunkirk.”

“This concert is a fusion of sound and vision,” said concertmaster Peter Hanson. “The first half of the concert is a collection that inspires visions and the second half is music that is inspired by vision. The Holberg Suite by Grieg is a visual portrait of a Scandinavian story, complete with landscapes and people; the Adams’ inspires one to see the music as slowly changing patterns of feelings in the air. The fantastic collection of music in the second half illustrates the emotions of film. Here the vision has inspired the music. It’s often the essence of the film concentrated into musical expression.”

 Hanson is a period instrument specialist and recording artist. He is in his ninth season as concertmaster of the Carmel Bach Festival Orchestra. He has performed with modern and period instrument including the Academy of St. Martin in the Fields and the London Symphony and served as concertmaster for Mstislav Rostropovich and the Philharmonia Orchestra as well as Sir John Eliot Gardiner’s Orchestre Revolutionaire et Romantique for more than 25 years appearing on nearly all its recordings and concerts.

Jul
23
Tue
Bach and the Viola – Week 2 @ Sunset Center Foyer
Jul 23 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm

Sarah Darling, viola

Christopher Hossfeld, Fantasie in C

(a reaction to the Bach 3rd Suite; world premiere of the version for viola)

Paul Hindemith, Sonata op. 25/1

Caroline Shaw, In Manus Tuas

J.S. Bach, Suite No. 3, BWV 1009

English Ayres for the Theatre – Week 2 @ All Saints Episcopal Church
Jul 23 @ 2:30 pm – 3:30 pm

Virginia Warnken Kelsey, mezzo-soprano; Andrew Fuchs, tenor; Jonathan Woody, bass-baritone; Stephen Bard, oboe; Edwin Huizinga and Adriane Post, violin; Sarah Darling, viola; Paul Dwyer, cello; Dan Swenberg, guitar and lute; Dongsok Shin, harpsichord

 

The First Musick:
Henry Purcell        Curtain Tune (from Timon’s of Athens) – Rondeau Minuet, Aire, Jigg (from the Gordion Knot Unty’d)
(1659-1695) 

The Tempest:

  • Matthew Locke, Curtain Tune
    (c.1621-1677)
  • James Hart, Adieu to the Pleasures and Follies of Love
    (1647-1718)
  • Mathew Locke, Rutick Air
    (c.1621-1677)
  • Henry Purcell, Dear Pretty Youth
    (1659-1695) 

The Fairy Queen:

  • Come all ye Songsters 
  • Prelude
  • One Charming Night 
  • Hush, no more 
  • Dance for the Followers of Night

The Second Musick:

Slow Aire (the Distressed Innocence) & Hornpipe on a Ground (The Married Beau)

The Judgments of Paris:

  • Daniel Purcell, Mercury’s aria: From Olympus, I come
    (1664-1717)      
  • John Eccles, Symphony & Venus’ aria:  Nature framed thee sure for loving
    (1668-1735)  
  • Daniel Purcell, Paris’ aria: I yield, take the Prize
    (1664-1717)  

The Third Musick:

Henry Purcell, Rondeau Hornpipe (Abdelazar)

King Arthur:

Henry Purcell, Chaconne: How Happy the Lover

                                                    For Love, every Creature is formed by his Nature 

Saints and Sinners – Week 2 @ Sunset Center Theater
Jul 23 @ 7:30 pm – 9:30 pm

Orchestra, Chorale, Chorus, Soloists conducted by Paul Goodwin
Mhairi Lawson, soprano; Meg Bragle, mezzo-soprano; Thomas Cooley, tenor; Dashon Burton, bass-baritone;

George Frideric Handel        Acis and Galatea

 Overture

Chorus : Oh the pleasure of the plains

Tenor Aria (Acis): Love in her eyes

Soprano Aria (Galatea): As when the dove

Bass-Baritone Aria (Polephemus) : I Rage –  /  O Ruddier than the cherry

Trio : The flocks shall leave the mountains

Tenor Aria: Help, Galatea, Help!

Chorus : Galatea Dry thy tears

Igor Stravinsky  The Rake’s Progress

Instrumental Introduction

Tenor Aria:  Here I stand

Chorus and Bass Solo:  The Sun is Bright

Soprano – cabaletta:  I go, I go to him

Mezzo-Soprano Aria : Come, sweet, come; Scorned, Abused

Chorus : Ruin, Disaster. Shame

Tenor aria :  I Burn, I burn! I freeze; With roses crowned

Chorus:  Mourn for Adonis

Epilogue

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart  The Marriage of Figaro

Overture

Soprano and Bass-Baritone Duet: Cinque, Dieci, Venti

Bass-Baritone Aria:  Se vuol ballare

Mezzo-Soprano Aria: Voi che sapete

Tenor Aria: In quagl’anni

Soprano, Tenor, Bass-Baritone Trio: Cosa sento

Chorus : Gio Vani liete

Georges Bizet  Highlights from Carmen

Overture

Mezzo-Soprano Aria: Gypsy song

Tenor Aria: La fleur que tu m’avais

Mezzo-Soprano and Chorus: Habanera

Soprano Aria: Je dis que rien

Bass-Baritone and Chorus: Toreadors Song

“All opera is about saints, sinners, seducers, victims and death! In this evening of drama and excitement we present four contrasting operas that show elements of all these traits that make opera so compelling,” said Paul Goodwin

The Tuesday evening performances explore the saint and sinner characters as depicted by four major opera composers. The evening begins with the story of the beautiful Galatea’s (Mhairi Lawson) love for the shepherd Acis (Thomas Cooley), and of the monstrous giant Polyphemus (Dashon Burton) jealousy and desire for Galatea.

Stravinsky’s The Rake’s Progress is a neo-Baroque work, and is nothing like you might have heard before from the Russian master. The story tells of Tom Rakewell (Thomas Cooley), an impressionable young man who jilts his fiancée, Anne Trulove (Mhairi Lawson), for the get-rich-quick promises made by the sinister Nick Shadow (Dashon Burton), who really is the Devil. After several misadventures, all initiated by the devious Shadow, Tom ends up in Bedlam, an insane asylum. In true devotion to Tom, Anne Trulove rescues his soul at the opera’s conclusion.

Mozart’s Marriage of Figaro beings with one of the shortest but most memorable overtures in the repertory. The opera tells the story of the servants Figaro and Susanna, who get married. This spoils the efforts of their philandering employer, Count Almaviva to seduce Susanna, teaching the sinner Count a lesson in fidelity. Marriage of Figaro’s lighthearted and melodic sensibility has made it an audience favorite since its debut in 1786.

The evening concludes with Carmen, which has everything that makes for a beloved opera: passionate drama, great characters, a love story, and some of the best known and loved music. Bizet’s work is packed with great and instantly familiar melodies including the Habanera and the Gypsy Song—sung by the title character as performed by Meg Bragle— and concluding with the Toreador’s Song, as performed by our Toreador, Dashon Burton. The character of Carmen is both saint and sinner and serves as the perfect capstone for the evening. She is a seducer, yet is also a fragile victim and strong feminist.

Jul
24
Wed
Bach and the Lute – week 2 @ Sunset Center Foyer
Jul 24 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm

Daniel Swenberg, lute, Dongsok Shin, lautenwerk

Exploring Bach’s music for the Lute and Lute-Harpsichord (Lautenwerk)

 

Sylvius Leopold Weiss, Duet in C: Andante, Minuet
J.S. Bach, Prelude (Grave, Vîte)—Lute, BWV 995
J.S. Bach, Prelude, Fugue, Allegro — lautenwerk, BWV 998

 

A Century of Venice – Week 2 @ All Saints' Episcopal Church
Jul 24 @ 2:30 pm – 3:30 pm

Johanna Novom, Evan Few, violin; Kyle Miller, Joseph Tan, viola; Eva Lymenstull, cello; Daniel Swenberg, lute; Dongsok Shin, harpsichord.

 

Johann Rosenmüller                                 Sonata Decima à 5 in F Major
(1619-1684)

Giovanni Battista Fontana                      Sonata Seconda a violino solo
(1589-1630)

Antonio Vivaldi                                             Trio Sonata in A Major, Op. 1, no. 9, RV 75
(1678-1741)

Domenico Gabrielli                                  Ricercar for Violoncello solo
(1659-1690)

Biagio Marini                                              Passacaglia from Sonata a tre, Op. 22
(1594-1663)

Johann Rosenmüller                                Sonata Ottava à 5 in E Minor
(1619-1684)

Dario Castello                                              Sonata Decima Quinta à 4
(1602-1631)

Quartets in the Forest @ Church in the Forest
Jul 24 @ 5:00 pm – 6:00 pm

Peter Hanson and Emlyn Ngai, violin; Kyle Miller, viola; Paul Dwyer, cello

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, String Quartet No. 21 in D Major, K 575
Ludwig van Beethoven, Quartet in Eb Major, op. 74, “The Harp”

 

Mozart’s String Quartet No. 21 is the first of three Prussian Quartets because of their dedication to the King of Prussia, Friedrich Wilhelm II. The beautiful quartet is notable for the equal prominence given to all four parts and for the and for the remarkable and melodic nature of the cello part, the instrument that Friedrich Wilhelm played.

Christmas at the Mission – Week 2 @ Carmel Mission Basilica
Jul 24 @ 8:30 pm – 9:30 pm

Orchestra and Chorale conducted by Andrew Megill

J.S. Bach, The Christmas Oratorio, Part III and VI, BWV 248
Arvo Pärt, Seven Magnificat Antiphons

The Christmas Oratorio’s third and final cantatas comprise the major portion of the annual Carmel Mission Basilica concerts. Interlaced with the two cantatas are Estonian composer Arvo Pärt’s Seven Magnificat Antiphons, a stunning a capella work with texts that would normally be sung individually as antiphons to the Magnificat at Vespers on the seven evenings preceding Christmas Eve. Pärt’s composition is hauntingly beautiful and is a perfect suited for the Carmel Mission Basilica.

The fifth cantata depicts the journey of the Magi, and was meant for performance on the first Sunday after the  New Year and tells a story about unifying heaven and earth. All the elements of Bach’s great Passions are here, including an tenor evangelist to tell the story, beautiful chorales, and solo arias, all performed by members of the remarkable Festival Chorale.

The final cantata of The Christmas Oratorio was composed for the Feast of the Epiphany, or the final day of the Feast of Christmas. The work is one of joyful optimism, with a brilliant and festive chorus accompanied by an orchestra that continues the vivid and celebratory tone of the first cantata presented on the Sunday afternoon concerts. Trumpets and timpani close the Oratorio in a blaze of glory.

“This concert is the final chapter of the Christmas Oratorio journey, coupled with a set of beautiful a cappella works by Arvo Pärt, the great Estonian ‘spiritual minimalist.’ His Seven Magnificat Antiphons, sprinkled throughout the program, are meditative, trance-like, and transcendent,” said associate conductor Andrew Megill.

Andrew Megill is the artistic director of Fuma Sacra and serves as chorusmaster for the Montreal Symphony Orchestra. He is also music director of Masterwork Chorus and professor and director of choral activities at the University of Illinois. He is in his 12th season as associate conductor of the Carmel Bach Festival and director of the chorale and chorus.

Jul
25
Thu
Bach A Capella – week 2 @ Sunset Center Foyer
Jul 25 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm

Molly Quinn, Jennifer Paulino, soprano; Virginia Warnken Kelsey, mezzo-soprano; Andrew Fuchs, Timothy Hodges, tenor; Jonathan Woody, bass

Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina, Assumpta est Maria
Josquin Desprez, Ave verum corpus
Josquin Desprez, Virgo Prudentissima 
Orlando di Lasso,
 Tristis est anima mea
Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina, Super flumina Babylonis
Tomás Luis de Victoria, Nigra sum sed Formosa
Claudio Merulo, Vos qui reliquisti omnia
Heinrich Schütz, Selig sind die Toten
Johann Joseph Fux, Ad te, Domine, levavi
Johann Kuhnau, Tristis est anima mea
J.S. Bach, Jesu, meine Freude

Twilight in the Cathedral – week 2 @ San Carlos Cathedral
Jul 25 @ 5:00 pm – 6:00 pm

Andrew Arthur, harpsichord, organ, and director; Robert Farley, trumpet, Emlyn Ngai, Gabrielle Wunsch, Evan Few, Joseph Tan, violin; Clio Tilton, viola; Paul Dwyer, cello; Jordan Frazier, bass; Michael Beattie, harpsichord

Antonio VivaldiConcerto in D major for 4 Violins, Op. 3, No. 1 (from L’estro armonico)

Antonio VivaldiConcerto in D minor for 2 Violins, Op. 3, No. 11 (from L’estro armonico)

John EcclesA Sett of Aires made for the Queen’s Coronation (1702)

George Frideric Handel, Concerto in F major for Organ & Strings, Op. 4, No. 5

Gottfried FingerSonata in C for Trumpet, Violin and Continuo

 

Monterey’s iconic and beautiful San Carlos Cathedral has hosted Bach Festival twilight concerts for many years. The 2019 program features classic Baroque violin, organ and trumpet works. Enjoy some of the Festival’s finest Baroque musicians performing in the magnificent setting of the San Carlos Cathedral, just steps from downtown Monterey.

Signs and Seasons @ Sunset Center Theater
Jul 25 @ 7:30 pm – 9:30 pm

The magnificent Carmel Bach Festival Chorale takes the Sunset Center stage for an evening of music inspired by the seasons.

“The program is related to Saturday night’s Creation concert,” said associate conductor Andrew Megill. “The music is about the creation story in Genesis, especially the markers of time (sun, moon, and stars, and the seasons of the year). It is a varied program from Medieval secular song (as an audience sing-along!) to Brahms to an avant-garde piece about the sun, with Copland’s choral masterpiece (“In the beginning”) as a centerpiece.”

Mezzo-soprano soloist Meg Bragle joins the Chorale for the Copland. The Chorale is considered one of the finest professional chorales in the nation — come hear why!

 

  • Richard Rodney Bennett, The seasons of his mercies from “Sermons and Devotions”
  • Aaron Copland, In the Beginning (featuring Meg Bragle, mezzo-soprano)

Sun, moon, and stars

  • Samuel Barber, Sure, on this shining night
  • Benjamin Britten, The evening primrose
  • Johannes Brahms, O schoene Nacht
  • R Murray Schafer, Sun
  • Gyorgy Ligeti, Esjakka and Reggel

Spring

  • Thomas Morley, April is in my mistress’ face
  • Claudio Monteverdi, Io mi son giovinetta
  • George Gershwin, Sing of Spring

Summer

  • Frederick Delius, To be sung of a summer night on the water I
  • Anonymous, Sumer is i-cumen in sing-along
  • Benjamin Britten, The succession of the four sweet months from Five Flower Songs

 Autumn

  • Johannes Brahms, Spaetherbst
  • Jeremiah Ingalls, Harvest Hymn
  • Ralph Vaughan Williams, Linden Lea
  • Veljo Tormis, Heather from Autumn Landscapes

 Winter

  • Orlande de Lassus, La nuict froide et sombre
  • Morten Lauridsen, How hard the year dies from Mid-winter Songs
  • Claude Debussy, Yver, vous n’estes qu’un villain
  • Joni Mitchell, River

A New Creation

  • arr. Shawn Kirchner, Unclouded Day
  • Edgar Leslie Bainton, And I saw a new heaven
  • Shawn Kirchner, I’ll be on my way
Jul
26
Fri
Bach and the Flute – week 2 @ Sunset Center Foyer
Jul 26 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm

Robin Carlson Peery, flute; Karina Schmitz, viola; Simon Martyn-Ellis, guitar

Ludwig van Beethoven, Serenade, Op. 8 for Flute, Viola, and Guitar
Francesco Molino, Notturno, Op. 37 for Flute and Guitar
Wenzel Thomas Matiegka, Notturno, Op. 21 for Flute, Viola, and Guitar
Mauro Giuliani, Duettino facile, Op. 77 for Flute and Guitar
J.S. Bach / Charles Gounod, Ave Maria

Five to Fandango – Week 2 @ All Saints' Episcopal Church
Jul 26 @ 2:30 pm – 3:30 pm

Cynthia Roberts, Patricia Ahern, violin; Karina Schmitz, viola; Allen Whear, Timothy Roberts, cello

 

Franz Joseph HaydnQuartet Quartet in G Major, op. 64, no.  4

Gioachino RossiniSonata no. 6, “Il Tempesta”

Luigi Boccherini, Fandango Quintet

Sacred Treasures of Spain and England @ Carmel Mission Basilica
Jul 26 @ 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm


The Carmel Bach Festival presents The Schola Cantorum of the London Oratory School, the impeccably-trained and internationally-acclaimed choir of 40 boys aged 8-18, in a special a cappella concert, one performance only, at the Carmel Mission Basilica on Friday, July 26 at 4:00 p.m. The hour program features music ranging from the Spanish Renaissance (Francisco Guerrero, Tomás Luis de Victoria, Alonso Lobo, Juan Esquivel and Cristóbal de Morales) to English Tudor (William Byrd, Peter Philips and Thomas Tallis).

After listening to The Schola Cantorum, people describe its signature sound as intimate and completely ravishing, rich, angel-like, heavenly, majestic, sublime beautiful and inspiring.

 

Selections will include

  • Mission’ Sanctus, Fr Esteban Tápis, OFM
  • O quam gloriosum, Victoria
  • Ave Maria, Victoria
  • Ave Virgo sanctissima, Guerrero
  • O Domine Jesu Christe, Guerrero
  • O sacrum convivium, Guerrero
  • Peccantem me quotidie, Morales
  • Ego sum pants vivus, Esquivel
  • O quam suavis, Lobo
  • Ascendit Deus, Philips
  • Ave verum corpus, Philips
  • O nata lux, Tallis
  • Salvator mundi (I), Tallis
  • Ave verum corpus, Byrd
  • Haec dies, Byrd

The Schola Cantorum of The London Oratory School
Director, Charles Cole

Patrons: H.E. Robert Cardinal Sarah, H.R.H. Princess Michael Of Kent & Sir James Macmillan CBE

The Schola Cantorum of The London Oratory School sings at the London Oratory every Saturday evening in term time and on major feast days for School Mass throughout the year. Founded in 1996, the choir gives Catholic boys the opportunity of a choral education within the state education system from age 7 to 18. As well as its liturgical role, the Schola has recorded numerous soundtracks, including the Lord of the Rings and Harry Potter films, as well as CDs and programs for television and radio. The choir has also toured widely abroad, performing throughout the USA and Europe. In 2013 the Schola sang at High Mass in St Peter’s Basilica in Rome, and was the first visiting choir in history to sing at Vespers there. In 2015 the Schola toured Spain, singing a program of Spanish renaissance polyphony at the Cathedrals of Madrid, Segovia and Toledo as well as the Monastery of San Lorenzo el Real in El Escorial. The tour received extensive coverage on Spanish TV and Radio. In 2016 the Schola sang at a choral festival in Bavaria with the Tölzer Knabenchor before travelling to Venice to sing Mass at St Mark’s and a concert at the Church of San Salvador. In 2017 the Schola toured southern Spain singing in Seville and Granada. Later in the year the Schola went on tour to the USA singing in Boston, New York and Washington DC. The Choir is closely associated with Aid to the Church in Need, singing for services and events to help the Charity’s work in providing support to persecuted Christians, most particularly in Syria and Iraq. The Trebles have also sung for a number of the Royal Ballet’s productions at the Royal Opera House including The Dream and Nutcracker. Recent performances by the Schola include J S Bach’s St John Passion and the Christmas Oratorio at the London Oratory with evangelist Nicholas Mulroy, Monteverdi’s Vespers with the English Cornett & Sackbut Ensemble, and a joint performance of J S Bach’s B minor Mass with Westminster Cathedral Choir. The Schola released Sacred Treasures of England, its first album on the AimHigher Label in 2017.

GUITAR HERO – Week 2 @ Sunset Center Theater
Jul 26 @ 7:30 pm – 9:30 pm

Orchestra conducted by Paul Goodwin, Jason Vieaux, guitar

  • Gioachino Rossini William Tell Overture
  • Joaquin Rodrigo, Concierto de Aranjuez
  • Mark Mancina, Guitar Concerto (based on themes from Twister and other Mancina film scores
  • Ludwig van Beethoven, Symphony No. 4 in Bb Major, Op. 60

Rossini’s William Tell was the last of the 39 operas the prolific composer created. The overture is a miniature symphony in four parts depicting the opera’s Swiss Alps location. The overture is justifiably one of the best-known works in classical music. The four sections include dawn, an approaching storm, pastoral third section featuring a plaintive English horn and flute duet and the famous wild galloping finish. This final section portrays Swiss soldiers’ heroic battle to liberate their homeland and was used as the theme to the famous radio and television show, The Lone Ranger. 

The center of the concert is occupied by two guitar works—one, the greatest of the genre and the other a world premiere!  In Rodrigo’s Concierto de Aranjuez, you can hear the creative juxtaposition of folksongs with the composer’s imaginative orchestration. The composition’s lyrical themes and its animated dance rhythms are evocative of the gardens of Aranjuez, Spain and the warmth of the Andalusian sun that inspired the work.

Hollywood film composer and Carmel resident Mark Mancina trained as a classical guitarist, and made his name with the scores to movies such as Twister and Speed. Mancina has taken two of his film scores and added a brand new first movement to create a Guitar Concerto.

The soloist for both concerti is Jason Vieaux, a Grammy-winning artist known for his soulful artistry. Vieaux has performed as concerto soloist with over 100 orchestras, including Cleveland, Toronto, Houston, San Diego, Buffalo, Auckland Philharmonia, and Orchestra of St. Luke’s. Recent highlights include performances at Caramoor Festival as Artist-in-Residence, Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, Philadelphia Chamber Music Society, Curtis Presents, Phillips Collection, National Gallery of Art, Buenos Aires’ Teatro Colon, Amsterdam’s Concertgebouw, New York’s 92Y, and Ravinia Festival.

The concert concludes with Beethoven’s sunny Fourth Symphony. The work harkens back to Beethoven’s teacher, Haydn, and has an extraordinarily explosive final movement. The piece is a continuation of a the very popular Beethoven symphony cycle that began in 2015.

“I view introducing new compositions as an essential part of an artistic director’s job,” said Paul Goodwin. “To encourage new talent, to enrich the listening experience of our audience, to appeal to our youth and to help create pieces that will help establish the Carmel Bach Festival as an innovator throughout the world. I am thrilled that Mark Mancina has accepted our commission and has written such a beautiful piece. My other main goal for this concert was to surround it with sympathetic sounds and compositions and to leave our Festival audience breathless with Beethoven’s most thrilling finale!”

Jul
27
Sat
Viennese Matinee @ Sunset Center Theater
Jul 27 @ 11:00 am – 12:00 pm

J.C. Bach, Overture to La calamita de’ cuori, W.G. 27

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Piano Concerto in A Major, K. 414
Dongsok Shin, fortepiano

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Andante in C Major for Flute and Orchestra , K. 315
Robin Carlson Peery, flute
Franz Joseph Haydn, Symphony No. 6, “Le Matin”

Emlyn Ngai, Tatiana Daubek, Naomi Guy, Elizabeth Stoppels Girko, Ann Duggan, violin; Meg Eldridge, viola; Paul Rhodes, Timothy Roberts, cello; Bruce Moyer, bass; Neil Tatman, oboe; Laura Koepke, bassoon, Alicia Mastromonaco, horn; Dongsok Shin, fortepiano

 

The Festival’s final day begins at the Sunset Center with a charming program featuring Dongsok Shin on the fortepiano (the precursor to the modern piano), as well as principal flutist Robin Carlson Perry.

Virginia Best Adams Masterclass Showcase @ Carmel Presbyterian Church
Jul 27 @ 1:30 pm – 2:30 pm
Virginia Best Adams Masterclass Showcase @ Carmel Presbyterian Church | Carmel-by-the-Sea | California | United States
Four emerging vocal stars from our Master Class program perform Baroque masterpieces with members of the Festival Orchestra. 

DIETERICH BUXTEHUDE             Cantata: Befiehl dem Engel, daß er kommt, BuxWV 10
(1637 – 1707)

JOHANN SEBASTIAN BACH          Cantata, Schau, lieber Gott, wie meine Feind, BWV 153 
(1685-1750)

  • Chorale: Schau, lieber Gott, wie meine Feind
  • Recitative: Mein liebster Gott, ach laß dichs doch erbarme
  • Aria: Fürchte dich nicht, ich bin mit dir
  • Recitative: Du sprichst zwar, lieber Gott, zu meiner Seelen Ruh
  • Chorale: Und ob gleich alle Teufel
  • Aria: Stürmt nur, stürmt, ihr Trübsalswetter
  • Recitative: Getrost! Mein Herz
  • Aria: Soll ich meinen Lebenslauf
  • Chorale: Drum will ich, weil ich lebe noch                                                           

JOHANN SEBASTIAN BACH      Es wartet alles auf dich, BWV 187
(1685-1750) 

Part 1

  • Chorus: Es wartet alles auf dich
  • Recitative: Was Kreaturen hält
  • Aria: Du Herr, du krönst allein das Jahr mit deinem Gut

Part II

  • Aria: Darum sollt ihr nicht sorgen noch sagen
  • Aria: Gott versorget alles Leben
  • Recitative: Halt ich nur fest an ihm mit kindlichem Vertrauen
  • Chorale: Gott hat die Erde zugericht’

Virginia Best Adams Fellows:

Nola Richardson, soprano; Clara Osowski, mezzo-soprano; Corey Shotwell, tenor; Will Prapestis, baritone

Artists:

Johanna Novom, Amelia Roosevelt, violin; Cynthia Keiko Black, viola; Eva Lymenstull, cello; Bruce Moyer, bass; Daniel Swenbery, theorbo; Stephen Bard, Ellen Sherman, oboe; Daniel Swenberg, lute; Michael Beattie, organ and director

Best of the Fest @ Sunset Center Theater
Jul 27 @ 7:30 pm – 9:30 pm

Favorite selections from the Festival are performed in this closing night concert that celebrates music, Carmel, the musicians of the Bach Festival, and the Festival’s loyal patrons. The program is a sampler of musician and audience favorites from throughout the two-week Festival.

The concert is sponsored by the former presidents of the Carmel Bach Festival, and is followed by a celebratory reception on the Sunset Center Terrace toasting the conclusion of the 82nd Festival.

Best of the Fest is a special, not-to-be-missed party that commemorates and honors music, the enduring legacy of Johann Sebastian Bach, the tradition of the Carmel Bach Festival, and the special and mystical setting of Carmel-by-the Sea.